Beginning of peasant education

It is known in history that conquerors of Estonia have come from ancient times, from every corner of the world: from Russia, Sweden, Denmark and Germany. The dwarf witnesses are the buried castles and castle castles across Estonia and the only surviving Kuressaare Episcopal castle. On the eve of the 21st century, it remains to ask just why and for all these wars, and hope that it will never happen again.

The need for teaching the peasantry arose already in the 13th century when the forces of the Livonian Order with the Danes were conquered by Estonia and eventually Saaremaa (1260-61). The Tauratuslike Estonian people needed to be obedient to the new authority. In the middle of the 13th century, the construction of churches began in the country, so that the peasants could become Christians. An even greater workload for the construction of churches was added to the old manorial work. The faithful warriors did not know the Estonian language and, therefore, the church cult did not develop, the peasants stayed home instead of listening to the Sunday sermon.

From 1629, Estonia went under Swedish rule. In 1634, the Livonian Consistory and Visitation Order was requested by pastors of the parishes to teach peasant catechism to read, i.e. Say the pasty to the pastor until he remembers. The order could not be filled because the pastors did not know Estonian and there were not enough literate Estonians.

In 1641 the first Estonian aide Ihering was created. It also appeared in Swedish. Arrangement was ordered on Iherin's request: the peasants had a pre-ordained sermon last Sunday to slander their pastor before the next Sunday's sermon. Soon Ihering was forgotten with his first spider.

In the year 1656, a Russian-Swedish war broke out, which slowed down the life of every field. In addition to war conflicts, plague began to spread, which destroyed a large part of the Estonian people, including the Germans and pastors. In the years 1665 -90 there was no schooling due to the plague, even at the University of Tartu, Academia Gustaviana, founded by Gustav II Adolf in 1632. Only 11 citizens survived in Kuressaare.

In the years 1660-1672, under the guardianship of King Charles XI and with the support of the government, they secured the privileges of the Baltic states and in 1671 the peasants' status was completely formalized. The kingship strengthened to such an extent that the State Day with the legislative rights remained only an advisory body.

In 1694, the county council of judges was abolished and the convening of Earth Day was terminated. In Estonia, the royal power of Sweden was until 1697.

The idea of ​​the creation of a peasant school network re-emerged from the Finno-Ugrian Bengt Gottfried Forselius in 1679. He was fluent in Finnish, Swedish, German and Estonian, studied at a university in Germany and began to train church pastors to teach Estonian in church painting, writing, computing, German, and even bookbinding.

Forselius first introduced the vocabulary teaching, i.e. syllabic read teaching. The second innovation was the writing of double-written letters once. The third proposal was to use the spoken language as a peasant to speak the language of the script, rather than the vocabulary of Germans who spoke Estonian.

During the Biblical conferences of 1686-87, Forselius's innovations were rejected by representatives of the consortiums of Estonia and Saaremaa, although it was easier to read them.

In 1686, Forselius was first published in the Estonian language, which was immediately criticized, but nevertheless, the impact of his innovations was enormous and several reprints appeared.

Forselius was killed in a shipwreck from Stockholm to Tallinn in 1688, being only 28 years old. His ideas were further developed by the linguist and writer J. Hornung, who, at the time of his deportation, presented the King of Sweden, Karl XI, in the year 1689 for the first time, an order to create one peasant school in each of the Livonian parishes.

The construction of school buildings was commissioned by a local knight. Unfortunately, these orders were not fulfilled due to the opposition of the knighthood.

Peasant education continued to be at the level of reheater, even Forselius's scouts were picked up. The reason for this was that his linguistic changes caused the alienation of the Bible and German. Forselius and his father, the rector of Tallinn's Toomkool, were both completely mundane in Estonian. At that time, there was no official school in Saaremaa.

In 1695, Karl XI gave a new order for the creation of peasant schools, and was directly called Saaremaa. On this basis only the school teacher was appointed to the parish. The manor was to give the teacher one farm (5-6h) field. It is known that in the year 1716 the Parish Church was training 4 children. In 1706 the school teacher Karja and Jaani (Mustjala) parishes were taken.

A major change was brought to Estonia by the Northern War between Russia and Sweden between 1700 and 1710. King of Sweden, Karl XII, was defeated by the war, Peter I, who went on to "make a window to Europe". Estonia became a part of the Russian Czar for several centuries. As a result of the Great Northern War and plague, only 130,000 - 140,000 were after the 350,000 Estonians.

In 1711, the Tsar's representative gave orders for the establishment of peasant homes, but war and plague had destroyed previous efforts to promote education.

In the year 1720, "Eesti-Ma Rahva Kalender" was released containing weather forecasts, household and medical advice. This was the first Estonian calendar.

By the decision of the Consistory from 1721, the Estonian Publishing Treasury issued "Eesti-Ma Keli Kodo" and "Kirko-Ramatu", later added several reprints of catechism and the New Testament.

In 1725, the landowners decided to demand from the peasants half a cold (about five pounds) of another or rye, one bird (1.4 cubic meters) of wood and one pound (400 g) of candles for the training of each child.

In 1730, the superintendent J.Metzhold succeeded in obtaining a decision by the Knight on Earth - the church leaders and the manors to ensure that the peasants would send their children to the school from the age of 10 to churches. Thieves were threatened with a fine and a shameful ban. By that time, the riders-teachers were employed at the churches.
Three wounds were taught: the first one was taught, the second and third years of reading catechism and biblical texts, and writing tales more. Students lived in the cattery for five days at the church, taken away from their home. At home, students had to "go on" for two weeks before the Easter at the canteen.

In the year 1739, Baron O.F. was edited by the county governor of Livonia. Rosen's declaration of the peasants so far left as lords, whom the estate man could inherit, sell, or otherwise dispose of with the property. Their lands were mused, i.e. the peasant was turned into a suicide. It struck the breath of a vigorous seal on the waking peasant, pushing the earth down. The peoples were even exchanged for dogs.

On April 18, 1765, Governor General of Livonia, G.Browne, issued a school bonus of 13 points. It defined the field of home education and the activities of cats schools, the obligations of landlords to build school buildings, and required a report on the number and progress of pupils from day to night.

The men feared raising the awareness of the peasants and stood against education. Even the Russian Tsar thought it fit to keep the peasant in spirit. At the end of the 18th century, only 85 pupils in Saaremaa were able to read 63.5% and write 2.3%.

In 1782, F.W.Willmann, who worked on pastoral care in Saaremaa, pastor, issued a book entitled "Stories and Teggud", which comprised 54 calendars, 35 spells and 125 riddles. In addition to bee keeping and animal healing teachings. This book became so popular that four reprints appeared on it. Willmann considered the peoples to be the most important people in the world, who feed on higher positions and who, with the support of the state, remain.

In 1795, OW.Massing, a fighter for the Estonian language, "ABD. Reading Ramat for Children" was published. It was larger than the previous ones. For the first time, it was also teaching parents parents how to teach reading. For the first time, there was also a one-time table and secular talk.

1803 introduced the rules for the education of the population for the introduction of four-level school arrangements: parish schools, curricula, provincial schools (upper secondary schools), universities. Parish schools for the Taliban were left over to the peasants and peasants.

In 1811, a new ABD reader of the Halliste pastor, Viljandi County, also included natural-language and geographic descriptions. This was followed by the first arithmetic textbook by the pastor of the Saaremaa Holy Father, P.H.Von Frey. In the first part, the numbers were up to a million, and the units were fractured. In addition, the functions of the measurement and weighting system.

According to 1814, Saaremaa parish schools were located in Muhus, Pöidel, Jaani, Karja, Kaarmal, Kiral, Kihelkonnal and Jämaja. Home studies were held in the Holy, Valjala, Mustjala, Anseküla.

Saaremaa's educational lore is an important place for Johann Wilhelm Ludvig von Lucel, who started as a pastor of the Holy Congregation and has been working as an inspector of the school district in Kuralevska 1804-1820.

Luce was a definite fighter for peasant education with theology and medical education. In 1816, his "Terws and Catechism Ramat" schools and "Sarema Jutto-ramat" appeared, which, in addition to Willman's "Stories and Teggud", appeared on the second reading in Saaremaa. The book contained original talks about West Saaremaa.

In 1817, the Kuressaare Estonian Society was founded on the initiative of Luce for the study of Estonian. Luce's activities also encouraged the local landowners to pay more attention to education.

Unlike Luce, the German teacher E.Meyer, who believed that Estonians are Mongols, have proven to be unaware of their cultural abilities, has passed the history of the German High School. It is a foolish sentimentality for them to become familiar with, such as being sympathetic to the reddening hides of the penetrating seal. The establishment of schools for them is only anxiety. Another non-official country councilor, H.A.Bock, has said that there is no need for the peasant to read, pray and work fruitfully.

In 1818, the first "Writing-Sheets" appear, with 20 pages of text and tutorials on how to crawl and hold the pencil.

Home tutoring to the village school

In 1816, the serfdom was abolished in Estonia and a law on peasant labor was introduced, which, among other things, provided for the construction of one school per 1000 inhabitants. A school teacher appointed by the municipality was released from military service, from the bulk of the bounty and from the battleship. The school commitment began at the age of 10, and the school year lasted from November 10 until March 10. The pastor had to "try to go to school" twice a year.

Due to the law, the Actum development plan for the Kaarma Parish School Network was prepared on September 30, 1817. It was signed by county governor Otto von Buxhöwden, Director of the Church Supreme Leader and Consistory Otto von Buxhöwden, Superintendent and Consistory Member August Henrik Smidt, assessor from the constellation Natalia major Otto von Sass, consortium assessor, pastor Peeter Heinrich von Frey, head of the consortium, pastor Friedrich Harter.

1817 is considered to be the beginning of the Vaivere school.

Despite the magnificent plan, the teaching of home teaching continued for a long time. Vaivere acted as home teacher at this time Arva Anni, who lived on the border of Vaivere and Kasti village. Since there was no schoolhouse at that time, he went to teach children in families.

From 1828 and 1829 archival documents for the training of peasants in Kaarma parish have been preserved. The protocol drawn up on May 13, 1828 gives an overview of children's reading skills in 18 controlled village schools, including Vaiveres. From there, we find that 62 students in Vaivere village, 3rd in the parish, had 36 boys and 26 girls. Among the boys there were rollers 6, average readers 16, ready-made learners 14. Among the girls there were rollers 3, average readers 11, ready-made learners 12. Their tutor was still Arva Anni.

From 1834 onwards, the Jakson family began to be taught by children. Juhan Jakson (1804-1856), who settled in the new home, was a landlord, who first taught the children in the Uustalu chamber after he was reading the curriculum. Juhan died at the breeder and his work continued with the son of Mart Jakson (1826-1876).

The study took place in the Uustalu chamber for ten years, until the owner of Murats manor, Baron von Güldenstubbe, in 1858, built the first schoolhouse in Vaivere. There had to be two classrooms, a teacher room, two slabs. The second plate had to have red lines of noodles. The bed linen for 12 students was also foreseen. The parish received paper, dashboards and slabs. School teacher, Mart Jakson, settled down with her family to live in a schoolhouse. Each parent had to bring one pound candle (about 400 g) and one sylla tree for the school teacher.

After Mart Jackson's death, his work continued on the son of Karl Jakson (1856-1920). He worked at Vaivere School until 1913. In the years 1888-1910 Vaivere worked as the second teacher Otto Lember as a teacher.

In 1877, Otto von Buxhöwden, the son of Güldenstubbe, became the owner of the Muratsi manor, who contributed to the development of the school in full measure: he was in need of training materials, repairs, etc. Vaiveresse also brought children from the area of ​​other manors, and the school became a serious center of education in the region. Teachers of Kaarma Church J.L.J. contributed to the promotion of school education. Girgensohn and Fr.W.Ederberg.

In the middle of the 19th century a new religious movement arose - an apostolic orthodox invasion of Lutheran, and also the construction of dome-dominated churches was started in Saaremaa. Closer churches were built in Piilas and Reos. In 1848, the Orthodox population accounted for 22% of the population of Saaremaa. To ensure lutheran education and educate educated teachers, a Kaarma seminar was set up following the Valga seminar.

It operated in the years 1871-1910 and prepared teachers for Saaremaa Rural and Parish schools. The study period was at first three years, then four years later. Alongside with basic subjects, he studied music theory, singing, choir management, organ music, book binding, horticulture, apiculture.

While 10-15 pupils from Kaarmal studied from other parishes, there were more than fifty students in Kaarm. The school was in charge of the knighthood, one of the parishes became one of the free places of study, the others had to pay a tuition fee of 20 rubles. 339 pupils have studied in the Kaarma seminar, only 189 young people have graduated from the course. The young men Friedrich Koppel, August Sepp, and Alexander Punab, who graduated from Vaivere School, also got a lot of training in the field. The impact of the Kaarma seminar was strongly felt in Vaivere's school and culture life.

In the late 19th century, Russian pressure further intensified, and the whole of Estonia was grabbed by a strong Russian-speaking substance, and Vaivere did not remain untouched. It was demanded that the teaching take place in Russian. Teachers had to start learning Russian, Kuressaare courses were organized for this purpose. The number of students in the school grew in school, and some of the classes were taken to rooms rented in Paimala, Mārti Farm, due to lack of space.

In general, education was generally welcomed, but there was a negative attitude. From the 30th issue of Saarlase's 1893 we can read: "The village masters should be let loose and put together schools, or money wipers. I'm in the cold room and I wear more clothes."
Each parent had to bring trees and candles to schoolmasters, and that's an outrage.

It is known from the end of the 19th century that the salary master's salary in Saaremaa was 18 rubles in the year 1886 and 50 kopecks; In 1890 31 rubles 25 kopecks. In comparison, the average annual salary of the manor house is 20 hops, 20 rubles, 2 pounds of salt; In addition, two vacuums were allowed to put potatoes in the manor's field and four remaining (finely ground) vegetable lands. Many schoolchildren also held a farm in addition to their basic work.

At the turn of the century, a prayer house was built on the yard of the school, where the leader of the local choir and the later preacher Juhan Koppel became the winner. Sunday's religious services, sacred concerts and Sunday school took place in this house. At the same time, the construction of a new schoolhouse was started on the order of Otto von Buxhöwden.

From the village to the general education school

The new century brought with it a revolutionary wave. In 1905, the tale of Elme, Kaarma and Loona manor was lit and sing "The mansions are burning, the Germans die, the forest and the land will be for ours". No manor houses were lit up in the Vaivere area. The villages were built in Eikla, Randvere, Uue-Kaarma, Laadjala and Elme manor houses.

A major educational event was the appearance of M.Kampmann's "School Reading Book" in 1905. In the textbook, emphasis was placed on literature, there was less grammar. Vaivere was then taught by Otto Lember, Jakob Mölder, Meeta Tuul, Friedrich Pihel, Karl Jakson.

Vaivere's new school building was completed by September 1, 1907. Subsequently, the construction of a Teachers' House for Endule, later bought by Karl Jakson with the countries. Otto Lember left the Teacher's Office, Karl Noogen came from Paimalast to Weight, and in 1910 Karl Jakson left school headquarters, replacing him Aleksander Punab, who was in office for thirty years, i.e. 1940.

After the First World War, Vaivere School continued to be four-class. Liidia Koov-Tamm was working. On December 2, 1918, the regulation of the Provisional Government of the Republic of Estonia was amended on the Saaremaa language: the teaching changed into native language, the lessons of German and Russian were reduced, the number of lessons in Estonian was increased, compulsory religious studies were turned into volunteers. Teachers were provided with heating and lighting (kerosene) in both the countryside and the city.

The inhabitants of the Vaivere, in connection with the Saaremaa uprising, in February 1919, participated in the massive livelihoods. The soldiers who had fallen on the Matis and Nigula fields in the Upa battle were picked up on the Vaivere Härma farm and helped to come to their liking. The men of the diver did not directly participate in the insurrection because they were mostly mobilized by the military. In those days, the school dropped out of school and Nigula's host died.

In order to better organize the education of Saaremaa, the school board was formed, which included also A.Punab and L.Tamm. 1920/21. According to the law on the revision of schools in the school year, Vaivere School was among the best in the county.

During this period, teachers' wage rates were also changed depending on education and living costs. The first-rank teacher received 500 mark + life cost money in 250 mark in the land and 400 mark in the city, a secondary education teacher in grade V received only 175 marks + 250 marks.

During the World War II, teachers were provided every month as follows:
10 pounds of herring and herring per family - 4 pounds.
2 pounds of fatty substances (vegetable fat) - 8 pounds.
2 pounds of potatoes per family member.
In addition to this year:
4, 25 arssinat suit (Arsin - 0.63 meters);
25 arssinat wash;
1 pair of new boots per teacher, 250 marka pairs,
half boots 100 marks.

The money needed to be paid for ordered goods.

A new era in the opening and closing of schools began in Saaremaa. In 1919, there were 138 public schools in Saaremaa, 112 in 1921, 1926 in 96 plus 7 private schools.

In 1923, the Vaivere 4-grade school was changed to sixth grade. Subjects came to V and VI. The day began with prayer and was taught in united classes. There was a huge lack of space, nobody wanted to go to school: there was no bus service at the time, and there were not many bikes in every family. The building was started in the school building, it was completed in 1931. The celebration of this event will be announced by "Our Earth" on October 1, 1931: "At the Vaivere School, the rebuilt schoolhouse opening party will be held on October 4. Acts 4 and 3 will be performed by Mähle and the high priest Ristkokk. death was born ".

During these years, Alexander Punab, who also taught mathematics, German and craftsmanship, still worked as a school leader. Liidia Tamm, graduated from Kuressaare Gymnasium, taught history, Estonian language and literature.

Students recall her beautiful handwriting and scripture teaching - still hands on the baby and stars in the right direction. He put a lot of emphasis on folk dance and taught the dancers as well. Meeta Tamm, a dance teacher who later became known in Kuressaare, has come under her arm. For many years, Karl Noogen and Mikhail Lempu worked at the school. Aleksander Punab retired in 1940.

The thriving years came to Estonia, and it also felt in the small Vaivere. For a short time, Eduard Int was in charge of the school leadership, followed by Peeter Virmastu in Germany. The exchange of teachers changed swiftly during the war years: who had come to the war pack who had left the city, and so on. In 1942, Albert Lõuk started working as a teacher in mathematics and physics at Vaivere School.

On September 1, 1944, the schoolhouse could not start school because the Germans had retreated into airborne munitions in the yard of the school, and therefore had a hard time suffering from the house: the shock wave had shifted walls from the foundation about thirty centimeters away, all the windows were broken. Everything was confused, the teaching equipment was scattered around the cabinets, the books were scattered inside the outside. In spite of the difficulties, the windows of the glazed house and local construction workers and parents, Juhan Sild, Jüri Martinson and Aleksander Reinart, restored the procedure under the guidance of Albert Lõugu, and the teaching began again on January 15, 1945.

The Soviet era brought about a number of changes in school life: the school head was renamed as director, a lot of emphasis was placed on military patriotic education, and a pioneering organization was created. On September 1, 1945, Albert Lõuk was appointed director.

Salme Loiken-Kõll and Linda Väärtnõu started their work as teachers. Liidia Tamm continued her work and gave her a Russian lesson, but soon she was transferred to Kuressaare Russian-language school as a Russian teacher. Her replacement was the director's wife, Niida Lõuk, who was later also chairman of the Kuressaare Russian Teaching Section.

Joseph Reinaru, who was the first scout director to be a pupil, became the pioneer and leader of the military patriotic field. The school was changed into a 7-class and in 1946 the first time, the 17th grade of the 7th form, stopped. Because the schoolhouse was narrow to the students, one room was rented from the Soera Farm as a classroom.

One year later, Karl Jõevere from Kärdukõla joined the pioneer office. Salme Loiken left in 1948 and Asta Kuldmaa (Maripuu) took over from her place.

In 1950, Vaivere School started with 5 class sets: I + II, III + IV, V, VI and VII grades. In early 1949, the teacher of elementary classes, Silvi Janson, in 1952, Ants Rand, a biology and boy crafts teacher, had worked for Vaiveres for decades.

On September 1, 1951, the doors of the school were thoroughly repaired: a corridor system, a new teacher room and a pioneer room, wardrobes and clothes stores. The new quality of teaching was begun - the premises were good and the frame remained. Essential teachers often came and stayed. In 1954, Asta Sepp began working as an Estonian teacher. Leida Paakspuu returned to her school as a German teacher in 1957.

The number of pupils in the school grew steadily, because in connection with the elimination of smaller schools, Ilpla and Vätta's children came to the Vaivere school in fifth grade and there was a serious need for a boarding school. In 1955, the Uustl house was left empty and now it was concluded with its owners a rental agreement for the accommodation of children. The necessary fixtures were provided in the rooms and the kitchen was furnished.

Ants Rand remembers: "There were three bedrooms and a kitchen in the interior, in one room there was a co-worker Alevtina Koopuu. There was no electricity in the village, there were kerosene lamps in the village, and they were put on by a burner." The schoolkeeper took care of the kerosene in the lamp. and the cost was recorded by the grower.Children brought home vegetables, juices, potatoes and meat.Steps, flour and sugar were brought to the school by a horse from the city.The internship was a place for eating and sleeping.These learning had to go to a schoolhouse located half a kilometer away from the grower. The Education Department was given an agreement to purchase the Uustl House. After the purchase-sale contract for 25 000 rubles, the building of the Uustl house was started. Three rooms and 2 walkways and an ancillary building were built on the farmhouse. The builders were Otto Kiider and Alexander Tang.

The lack of room for boys' work training also aroused concern, but Ants Rand and Albert Lõuk also found a solution to the problem and provided a boot dining room. True, it initially led to mischief with itself, and the enterprising school head was charged with misplaced use, but the following year it was received instead for praise. In one room there were tools, a wood beam and a pinch; In the right place, in a rustic room, the boys could independently sail, sing, and make.

In 1961, the school was changed to 8-year-olds, and the graduates of the following year were left behind for eight years in Vaiveres.

Ants Beach remembers:
I taught biology, geography, chemistry, physics and boy crafts. We built a school day to improve our work. It was one of the few campaigns of the Soviet era. 1 hectare of land was allocated to the school. First of all, it was necessary to draw up a garden plan and determine what and how much to grow. On this basis, we divided the plot of land according to the suitability of the fruit garden, berry gardens, vegetable garden and collectors' gardens. Apple trees were brought from the Kõljala nursery. In the spring we organized a bicycle tower Kõljalga with children and in the evening we came back with 60 animals. The mushrooms, 80 trotters, we got from Karja. The strawberries and flower plants, as well as the persistent ones, were mostly from the homes of children, later also the Botanical Garden of Tallinn. For watering the plants, we built a garden with a 36-meter deep water well with a borehole and a pump house.

In 1958 we built a small heated glasshouse. It was indispensable for breeding puppys. Everything was good and soon children started to wear a good hand and care. First of all, we began to harvest from the vegetable garden. After a few years, the Berry Garden began to rejoice with the talents of children, and the food table was enriched with currants and cherries. Students maintained the garden according to a specific schedule and harvested the crop that was kept in the fall to feed the diner.

The warm lunch was attended by all the students, the children of the boarding house were also served in the mornings and in the evenings. The apple tree planters had to wait for the fruits of their work for the longest time and could only taste some apple, because before the trees began to work, the school was out. In the future, we already got enough catches that we shared between children or exchanged for something. But the handiwork that has survived to this day is pleasant to remember both at that time school chicks and their supervisors. At the same time, the head of the school Albert Lõuku, who managed the management of the school intelligently and with solid leadership, can not be ignored.

In 1955 we got our small "meteorological station" - the square was a storm monitor, thermometers, a wind flags and a meter of wind strength. The results of the measurements were loaded onto the pier and forwarded to Tallinn Weather Station. The data we collected was also used in teaching. To keep the collected material, we built a small garden house where you could rest as the sun did too.

Students worked in the garden, on the sports field and around the schoolhouse with great enthusiasm, and schoolboys gained good places in the surveys, and well at the biology Olympiads.

In the 1960s, we succeeded in getting one old truck from Orinoco's military, which replaced the school's horse. With the machine, we were able to transport manure and gargle from the sea to the garden, and it was now easier to transport construction and repair materials. The boys also got to drive by car, and for this they were ready to do all the work. The car was fun to bring young foliage to the forest and Praakli manor land. These trees adorn the schoolhouse's surroundings to this day. Graduates of 1962 planted tree-like trees and snowflakes that grow to the school's yard until today.

At that time the schoolhouse was home to an elongated countryside, with over 30 species of cacti. There were also no animals, two fish aquarium with their own place and even animals that lived in a cage built specifically for them. The elbow was mainly maintained by girls.

For years 1952-1976, I worked at Vaivere School, I enjoyed my all-year career.

Recalls Leida Paakspuu-Keskküla:
I studied at Vaivere School and graduated from the 6th grade in the spring of 1944. Next year, the school changed to 7-class, and I came back to school and finished the seventh grade.

I came back to Vaivere School again and now as a German teacher. Long-time Russian and English teacher Niida Lõuk was preparing for retirement and the school needed a new foreign language teacher. The English teacher was not coming from somewhere and so decided to continue teaching German and I was recruited. She was supposed to come to her former teachers, but I saw that fears were in vain. Everything started to grow well, and my colleagues always gave me some advice when I needed it. The feeling familiar to your school was also helpful.

Remember the hourly points required in the first years of the teacher's training, which should have been carefully compiled according to the topics specified in the curriculum. On the one hand, it was good; on the other hand, the teacher hurt the creation and personality potential in teaching the subject. Over the years, his teaching methodology developed.

The education department's inspectors, as well as their director, went on to study both teaching and student levels in their classes. But even that gave you the confidence that you were on the right track.

Twice a year had to visit the students' homes. Other means of transport were not like a horse and a bicycle, and a trampoline in the winter. There were no problems with good students, but at any time, there were also their own Products at school, with whom parents had to communicate more closely. That's why it was quite far between, 5-7 km and Vättalgi has been driven away by the trampoline.

The teacher had a very high social work load. When the day-to-day group was formed at the school, we initially worked there on the basis of the schedule, and later the recruited breeder was recruited. Teachers often had to attend parenting presentations at parents' meetings, study politics, act as election analysts, etc.

In the 1950s, there was a shortage of everything, not just cars and bus traffic. The farm horses were taken to the farm. The school came from the kolkhoz to the former T. Dimithel's horse, who could carry bookcases, books, kerosene and other essential things from the city. The horse was also indispensable for gardening the land. Since there was no place for hay - the kolkhoz did not survive for our animals - we had to do it ourselves during the summer holidays. We received most of the hay from the garden of the school and from the field at the Uustlu boarding school. With horses, we brought hays to schoolmaster August Sop, and later to Uustl's reha. An internship chef, breeder and schoolmaster were in turn involved in the operation.

Another difficult additional work for female teacher was the bringing of firewood to the school. A forest tower was set up in the forestry, where the trees were located, a truck was obtained from the education department and then we drove in the truck in the forest box. The teachers were provided with 6 free rooms per year for their own use, and we could bring them together at the same time. Parents also helped us in this work.

In the year 1956, the small kolkhozes surrounding the Marine community joined the kolkhoz and Alexander Pitk became chairman. The collective farm began to go better and it was felt in school life. Under the leadership of A.Pitka and A.Lugun, the stage for the construction of the large hall of the Kasti manor began to be built, and the guys of older classes, under the guidance of Ants Ranna, helped the workmen.

In 1955 we got our small "meteorological station" - the square was a storm monitor, thermometers, a wind flags and a meter of wind force. The results of the measurements were loaded onto the pier and forwarded to the Tallinn Weather Station. The data we collected was also used in teaching. To keep the collected material, we built a small garden house where you could rest as the sun did too.

Students have been working in the garden, on the sports field and around the schoolhouse with great enthusiasm, and schoolboys have gained good places in the surveys, and well at the biology Olympiads.

In the 1960s, we succeeded in getting one old truck from Orinoco's military, which replaced the school's horse. With the machine, we were able to transport manure and gargle from the sea to the garden, and it was now easier to transport construction and repair materials. The boys also got to drive by car, and for this they were ready to do all the work. The car was fun to bring young foliage to the forest and Praakli Manor land. These trees adorn the schoolhouse's surroundings to this day. Graduates of 1962 planted tree-like trees and snowflakes that grow to the school's yard until today.

At that time the schoolhouse was home to an elongated countryside, with over 30 species of cactus. There were also no animals, two fish aquarium with their own place and even animals that lived in a cage built specifically for them. The elbow was mostly maintained by girls.

For years 1952-1976, I worked at Vaivere School, I enjoyed my all-year career.

Recalls Leida Paakspuu-Keskküla:
I studied at Vaivere School and graduated from the 6th grade in the spring of 1944. Next year, the school changed to 7-class, and I came back to school and finished the seventh grade.

I came back to Vaivere School again and now as a German teacher. Long-time Russian and English teacher Niida Lõuk was preparing for retirement and the school needed a new foreign language teacher. The English teacher was not coming from somewhere and so decided to continue teaching German and I was recruited. She was supposed to come to her former teachers, but I saw that fears were in vain. Everything started to grow well, and my colleagues always gave me some advice when I needed it. The feeling familiar to your school was also helpful.

Remember the hourly points required in the first years of the teacher's training, which should have been carefully compiled according to the topics specified in the curriculum. On the one hand, it was good; On the other hand, the teacher hurts the creation and personality potential in teaching the subject. Over the years, his teaching methodology has been developed.

The education department's inspectors, as well as their director, went on to study both teaching and student levels in their classes. But even that gave you the confidence that you were in the right track.

Twice a year had to visit the students' homes. Other means of transport were not like a horse and a bicycle, and a trampoline in the winter. There were no problems with good students, but at any time, there were also their own Products at school, with whom parents had to communicate more closely. That's why it was quite far between, 5-7 km and Vättalgi has been driven away by the trampoline.

The teacher had a very high social work load. When the day-to-day group was formed at the school, we initially worked there on the basis of the schedule, and then the recruited breeder was recruited. Teachers often had to attend parenting presentations at parent's meetings, study politics, act as election analysts, etc.

In the 1950s, there was a shortage of everything, not just cars and bus traffic. The farm horses were taken to the farm. The school came from the kolkhoz to the former T. Dimithel's horse, who could carry bookshops, books, petrol and other essential things from the city. The horse was also indispensable for gardening the land. Since there was no place for hay - the kolkhoz did not survive for our animals - we had to do it ourselves during the summer holidays. We received most of the hay from the garden of the school and from the field at Uustlu boarding school. With horses, we brought hays to schoolmaster August Sop, and later to Uustl's Reha. An internship chef, breeder and schoolmaster were in turn involved in the operation.

Another difficult additional work for a female teacher was the bringing of firewood to the school. A forest tower was set up in the forestry, where the trees were located, a truck was obtained from the education department and then we drove in the truck in the forest box. The teachers were provided with 6 free rooms per year for their own use, and we could bring them together at the same time. Parents have also helped us in this work.

In the year 1956, the small kolkhozes around the Marine community joined the kolkhoz and Alexander Pitk became chairman. The collective farm began to go better and it was felt in school life. Under the leadership of A.Pitka and A.Lugu

Valve Rauna remembers:
After graduating from Haapsalu Pedagogical School in 1955, I was assigned to work as a teacher at the Vaivere Elementary School for the 7th Class, where I worked until the end of 1961.

The work was like diving into an unknown place, that is, I had to do the kind of work that I did not receive at school: working as a composite class, pioneer manager, music teacher, boarding school cook, head coach, etc. Much had to read, study and supplement myself.

In August 1958, I also worked at the school as head of the Praakl National Board. Praakli manor house had collapsed and the folk house was located in Kasti manor. There was a brisk comradeship that demanded its share. In 1959, the People's House was liquidated. In the same year, I was appointed senior leader. I still had to do teacher work. I read the cover of the thick pioneer guide's manual to get an idea of ​​this work.
There was no electricity. The light petroleum jelly came to light at night late at night. I taught and studied with students. It can be concluded that the young man has done quite a lot. He did not dare to use the word "no" but instead began to do what was right now.

Composite classes were formed on the principle that a younger and older class would be together: I + III, IV + II. Thus, one class was allowed to work independently for ten minutes and to do oral work with the other.

Reading was an important sound analysis. The letters had to be pronounced, not the characters used. It was necessary to clarify that the letters are not counted alone, but with the next letter (bird, not el-i-en). An important helper was the moving asshole. In the words of the words in the warehouses, the child learned the words quite loosely and easily read the words.

When writing, we used soft pencils and demanded proper sitting, proper pencil and booklet position. Later we wrote all the work with ink. There were no postcards now.

In mathematics, it was necessary to enrich, refine and extend children's mathematical concepts of size, form, space and time, numbers and their composition. The children should have been able to compare things by size, they were familiar with circular, square and triangular objects, to feel the days of the week and the seasons. Watching was also necessary. A special emphasis was put on basic computing and text solving.

To rekindle the hours we played games, solved puzzles, and we sang songs.
The display devices were natural objects: nuts, apples, chestnuts, cones, leaflets, and the like. We stayed with the students in the yard, went to the garden and the forest, and learned how to create nature.

Director Albert Lõuk was demanding and rigorous in his work. He confirmed our work plans and hourly points. Vaivere's first years of work have left me enjoyable. I received my first work experience and life stories. Deep bowing to all those who gave their helping hands to the inexperienced youngsters: Albert Lõuk, Niida Lõuk, Silvi Janson, Asta Albert.

I have been guided by my principle - if you do something, teach it to children too. I often remind my students, they often remind me of M.Õunapuu's lips:
You, my pupil
I think and think
I mean, waking and waking:
how to give you the best,
give yourself all that
I can do and I can.

Student Organizations

In the thirties, the movement of scouts and home adventurers, as did Vaiveres, accelerated throughout Estonia. In 1931, a comprehensive renovation took place in the schoolhouse, facilities were expanded, and more affordable opportunities were opened for classroom activities.

In 1931 the first scourge was founded in Vaivere. There was a sighing representative Veli Aarma and a representative of the criminal police Talvik Kuressaare, a national scout director from Tallinn and a photographer Karl Salong. The scout was made by Joosep Reinaru, who was also elected as the leader of the squad, Hugo Kiider, Karl Kiider, Anton Reinart, Aksel Reinart, Heino Kivi, Erik and Endel Koppel, Aksel Noogen, Eduard Raud.
Horde became Cousin Albert (scared too young).

Meetings were held once a quarter. First of all, scout laws, commands, and line-ups were made clear, along with sculptures, trousers and knots. In the spring, interesting hikes and sports competitions were organized. During the summer, there was a ride on a hunting trip in Kuressaare Bay, where Karl Salong was captain.

In 1934 there was a big festive gathering, attended by Kuressaare sonorous leaders and school principal Aleksander Punab.

Harry Haamer, then the Teacher of the Holy Church, visited the village scouts in the village. He talked about polite behavior, communication and people-to-people relationships.

During the years of scathing, a large swing of two sides was built on the Forest Pond, and the first ball game playgrounds were under the guidance of Anton Reinat. In the 50's there were decent jogging and jumping tracks, and the school got to the stadium.

While boys were active in scouts, the girls found the application at home troupes in the organization. He was predominantly a student of songs and plays, was taught at Sunday School, performed on Mother's Day and church holidays. Girls also played a key role in communicative and comic teaching.

The exchange of power brought about new traditions and customs. Scouting was acknowledged as barbaric enough and unsuited to Soviet rule, and the pioneering organization began its activities. The youngest communist Ilmar Reinmägi became the first pioneer leader in 1940. No more information from this year.

In 1942, the "hunting" of the Germans began for the former activists, and so many of the first years of war were fatal. Burns teacher Lembri home Praakli and teacher of the Indi home in Tahul. Many homes were mourning and ignorant of the people, the economic situation was difficult.

In 1945, the pioneering organization started again. In the first years, pioneering work was very modest. The new organization was not motivated and even feared. Only a few years later, the pioneering work started. In the academic year 1945/46, Joseph Reinaru was the pioneer manager, after which Karl Jõevere began to work. The boys were arranged competitions, the girls cut out the pictures of war heroes from magazines and paste them into albums. It was also possible to give out a wall paper - they reflected the everyday school life and offered a lot of joy to the makers.

From 1947, the list of pioneering staff has survived: the chairman of the male council Taivo Lõuk, editor of the wall Agnes Õunapuu, members of the staff Aara Rahnel, Enn Lõuk and Loidi Vöörma.

On May 13, 1950, in the newspaper "The Island of Voice", an article "The Living Pioneer Work in the Vaivere 7th Class School" was published, in which he talked about the leading pioneer organization under the leadership of Silva Janson.

In the years 1954-57, Hilja Varvas worked as pioneer. Better opportunities were opened for pioneering: the boarding school and children were able to take part in the lessons after hours.

Annika Neitsov-Iin became the next pioneer. The splendid times of Vaivere's pioneering life began. Maire Aavik was the chairman of the Male Council at that time. The work was started by an active school under the direction of Evi Veegen.

In 1959, Vaiverre musician Mihkel Reinart returned to teach the guys to play the pill. The choir of pioneers of Vaivere was so well received that the second place was brought to Tallinn from the examination of school orchestras and a set of wind instruments was awarded for a prize of 12 thousand rubles. The son of Mihkel Reinarti, Peep, was led by the Orchestra at the House of Representatives because the adult could not be conductor. Peep told 50 years later how his father showed the movements in front of the corner and he was conducting his life! Many guys who had acquired the instrumental skill during the school season later moved on to the city's orchestras.

1960/61. In the school year, Valve Titma-Rauna was the pioneer leader. Under her guidance, the mandolin ensemble started working.

A Timurese group was set up to assist individual elderly people. Young naturalists maintained a lively corner in the schoolhouse and raised rabbits in their homes. The best rabbit growers were Eimo Väälik, Laine Muruvee, Enel Saun. Boys were arranged in-school competitions, in the district national soccer competitions II place was achieved.

The athletes were good despite the fact that the school was not able to train and was only trained outside.

This year, Vaivere's pioneer organization became the actor Artekki. It raised Vaivere's image throughout Saaremaa. The chairman of the Male Council, Maire Aavik, withdrew from the trip and was nominated to Evi Veegen, who was recognized as the best pioneer in the school.

Evi Veegen-Maasik remembers:
"Are you really Artek?" - I asked at the meeting of the PAC, unable to conceal my surprise and gladness. So it really was.

25 boys girls went to Estonia, all wearing a pioneer uniform. We were like real world travelers on the route Tallinn-Moscow-Simferopol. The nature of the South of the South conquers us all: cypresses, the Black Sea, the mountains that are projected around. It was April. Almond trees are now flourishing, tea fields on the heavens grew, as well as laurel, grape and mandarin fields.

The camp was located at the foot of the hill and consisted of four large complexes. The Estonians were dispersed to each other in order to become acquainted with the children of other nations and to develop friendships. I lived and studied with the Priests, Tadakikis and Belarussians. As a good friend, I became an Armenian Allga with whom I had been in correspondence for many years.

The whole camp was followed by fanfare signals: one woke up, the other called to eat, the third rivulet. Rivi was the main thing: still to eat at the bar, party, gathering. I was also selected on the camp's chess board, as well as my group co-worker Leelo Tungal.

In the morning we had hours in Russian. I was in the final grade (seventh year) and I also had concerns about graduation. I sent mathematics tasks to me, I did not have problems with other subjects. Every week Papa Luke sent me a large square page with mathematical assignments, I sent the solutions back again. I was the only one to be sent to the campus and I was very proud of my teacher Albert Laugh. As a matter of reminder, I still remind my teachers that I could go to Artek and in the spring to end the school.

Remember the great excursions to Simferopol and Yalta. We had to march and sing there. On the streets, cypresses that were cut into eagles and elephants grew. A spectacular experience was made by Aju-Dag.

On April 12, Juri Gagar flew to space. This triggered a huge feast of joy: the streets were offered cream cakes and wine, roses were planted on the streets. The camp was held on the nights of friendship. Estonian evening taught Estonian games and dances.

A lot of sports were done: athletics and ball games were held. I won the medals for high-value and highs and won the shirt.

The camp was also visited by foreign visitors. The Cubans, who were even darker skin than the local inhabitants, remembered.

Problems arose on the grounds of nationalities: Estonians were considered too Westernized; we were named after the generals pribaltiiskije, and in this word felt envy and concealed hostility. We were wearing the uniform in uniform at the camp. But our boys were outfitted, the Chinese were crocheted, the girls had lace-cuffs, nightgowns and girdles, which others did not have. We did not even have the jacket. We sewed our dressing trousers from the bottom of the rubber through the legs so that the trousers could stand straight. It all plagued others with a painful eye and struck a hinge. When the end of the load curve finally exchanged for their clothes, we looked pretty out: white blouses, neckties, instructor badges and wiggins. Our joy did not fit the soul of the "Siberian Jackets" and they called us fritts.
Little things did, however, did not violate the tremendous amount of experience that Artek really made us. Powerful impressions are still in the air.

In the following years, Viive Aus and Inna Jürjestau worked as pioneer leaders. New interesting events were added - they were held together in a twilight and enjoyed the winter glow. In the ball games, the boys of the city school won. The correspondence with the pioneers of Georgia and the descendants of Mahtra's warriors from Siberia was developed. Most of the students were pioneers.

The boys of older classes were helpful in building a schoolhouse and installing a greenhouse pipeline. In the spring, school-based Olympic Games were organized. For this event, a flag and a torch were made. The best athlete, the winner of the Olympics was crowned Harri Aduson. The great event was the war game played by Pihtla school. On May 23, 1963, the trip "Cross the Fighting Fathers" was organized on the Sõrve Peninsula.

From 1964 until the closure of the school, Maaja Härmat-Õnnis, Lilli Suurna-Vaga and Liivi Kuusk were working as pioneer leaders.

Years of Special Secondary School

From the 1970s, the school continued its activities as a specialty school, pupils exchanged, and school orientation changed.

School director Asta Albert reminds:
"The most urgent work was the overhaul of the front wall of the school building, because I could not be sure of the sloping logs. I was supported by Aleksander Veegen, who was the business manager. He also organized the sanitary renovation of the houses, maintained the accounting for the teachers' utilities, was concerned with heating and supplied food to the internship.

Special schools were well-equipped by the state, teachers were paid 25% higher salaries than in regular schools, with a higher food allowance, and boarding equipment and school uniforms were free. In those years, there were low-income families who did not hesitate to send their children to the Vaivere school, but they even expressed their desire for it, because maintenance was free.

The new pupils were mainly children with mental disabilities who could not meet the basic education requirements. They were very different families, with different mental developments. The school program was adapted to the level that provided the student with the necessary writing and calculation, reading and reading handwriting skills.

It was important to have a sense of responsibility. Growers needed a lot of individual training, especially in a calm and friendly atmosphere. They lived all on the internet. Most of the students were eager and were doing well in their schoolboys and internships.

Occasionally there were also strange cases. There was one bumblebee left once. When the boy was convicted, his father was called a militia school. The father said to his son: "You fuckin ', do you, and you still talk!" Comments are excessive.

The teacher asked the third-graders when the holidays are October holidays. Several answers were provided: autumn holidays, school holidays, etc. Finally, a boy raised his hand with a serious face, shoved his head, and said a hard, clear voice - the holidays.
It is also remembered how the teacher asked the question: "How many seasons are there?" and received the response "Springtime!"
"But is autumn not a season?"
"What kind of season is this, it's bumpy and dirty!"

After graduation, we watched the progress of our students, and several boys were entrusted to the collective farm on tractors. Two of her graduates married later, and their daughter studied mainly in a country school.

Since 1967 it had been in 1976 and the school was again at a crossroads: there were so many wishing for the school that they did not fit any more, and the older classes were then transferred to Kallemäe and the primary classes stayed there. The director's seat was lost and Etvelia Tamm continued work as a school head. Ants Rand became the head of the education department in the city, I retired at retirement. "

In 1981, the Vaivere Schoolhouse also completed the activities of the Special Education School. The children were brought together in Kallemäe school, teachers found a new job in other schools and other areas of life. During the years of the Special Secondary School, there were a lot of good teachers in the school who sympatheticly and with great warmth to their homes.
They were Asta Albert, Etveli Tamm, Saima Pira, Vilma Pau, Leida Poopuu, Mark Jon, Rein Sepp, Sulev Sepp, Marvi Sirkel, Linda Ots, Jüri Pehk, Marvi Kaljo, Sina Koost, Ellen Kahm, Mai Lember.

Teachers working for a long time at Vaivere School in 1910-1976

Aleksander Punab 1910 -1940 Teacher, Head of School
Karl Noogen 1908 - 1930
Mihhail Lempu
Liidia Tamm 1918 - 1945 Estonian and Russian, history
Albert Lõuk 1942-1967 Mathematics and Physics, Director 1948 - 1967
Shake the Left in 1948 - 1960 in Russian and English
Salme Loiken-Kõll 1945 - 1952 Russian, Girls' Crafts
Silvi Janson Basic Tutorial
Ants Rand 1952 - 1976 Biology, Chemistry, Physics, Poetry Crafts
Asta Sepp-Albert 1954 - 1970 Estonian Language and Literature, Director 1967 - 1976
Valve Tiitma-Rauna Primary Class, pioneer leader 1955-1961
Hilja-Nurja Rand 1956 - 1963 Mathematics
Leida Paakspuu-Keskküla 1957 - 1970 German
Saale Tang-Reinart 1959 - 1963 Mathematics
Helga Tatar 1963 - 1970 Elementary classes
Aino Pallas 1963 - 1976 Primary Classes
Ellen Kahm 1968 - 1981 Mathematician, educator
May Velvelt-Lember 1967 - 1981 Primary Classes
Niina Väin 1964 - 1970 Russian
Tarmo Allik 1964 - 1970 physical education

The following teachers have worked for Vaiveres for a shorter period:
Karl Jõevere, Joosep Reinaru, Asta Maripuu, Jete Laes, Ella Suur, Salme Pich, Jesse Kaevand, Aita Munk, Aino Tammesild, Marvi Kasekande, Laine Sepp, Hilja Varvas, Annika Iin, Veera Savkina, Mall Tiidovee, Vaike Roost, Helbe Lõun Viive Aus, Inna Jurjestaust, Loreida Neeme, Leini Mägi, Maaja Härma, Eevi Eelma, Urve Nõmm, Svetlana Jõgi, Harri Iin, Lilli Vikat, Mati Tarvis, Armilde Beljakov, Saima Kolesnikov.

Vaivere graduated from school

1939

Armilde Island
Lidia Allik
Helga Kask
Alice Albert
Aleksander Rahnel
Arnold Saart

1940

Aino Kuusk
Ester Reinart
Anton Hansen
Alfred Tiivits
Aksel Reinart
Ilmar-Ferdinand Kalm
Endel-Eduard Koppel
Eduard Raud
Ludvig Maripuu
Heino Nell
Roman Orula
Theodor saar
Friedrich Toompuu

1941

Hilda Käo
Ilmar Reinmägi
Aleksander Rüütel
Lembit Punab
Ardi Liiv
Utah Punab
Rudolf Kiider
Linda Lepik
Bruno Opp
Linda Martinson

1942

Agnes Martinson
Salme Kadarik
Aksel Punab
Olev Hansen
Herbert Laidma
Laine Lepik
Linda Reinart

1943

Wilhelm Jürgen
Sinaida Vöörman
Kalev Loiken
Alfred Kiider
Eduard Albert
Humo Rahnel
Linda Käo
Nadezhda Meiesaar
Aksel Maripuu
Külli Int

1944

Meade Kiider
Fluffy Koopuu
Kalju Forestland
Richard Martinson
Leida Paakspuu
Hedvig Lõun

1945 and 1946
(first 7-class flight)

Paul Hansen
Dude Albert
Nadezhda Hansen
Linda Martinson
Flower Maripuu
Gilbert Grass
Linda Alder
Silva Koppel
Nadezhda Knight
Blessed Island
Endel Reinart
Richard Martinson
Linda Reinart
Lembit Tõll
Valdeku Tamm
Leida Paakspuu
Hedvig Lõun

1947

Aino Reinart
Robert Kalm
Valter Grass
Lucia-Esmene Reinart
Lea Rahnel
Linda Laidma

1948

Heino Allik
Naima Lõun
Taivo Lõuk
Heino Rauna
Uno Reinart
Lia Reinmägi
Silvia Tornberg
Harri Vask
Loidi-Leo Vöörmaa

1949

Find Albert
Ülo-Endel Ting
Bruno Lõuk
Erich Martinson
Valdek Lõun
Asta Uuston
Agnes-Pärja Aunpuu

1950

Valve Kundrats
Enn Lõun
Eino Aavik
Aara Rahnel
Laine Kurikjan
Kaljo Kuldma
Valdek Aavik
Loreida Kundrats

1951

Vello Reinart
Aili Lõun
Ainu Opp
Paavo Lõuk
Helju Lepik
Ilmar Aavik
Endel Paakspuu
Without a hinge
Elle Aavik

1952

Urve Suurhans
Urve Nell
Hinge Lion
Maimo Allik
Aime Aru
Maimo Kolk
Arvo Lõuk
Veljo Kurikjan
Heldur Reinart

1953

Lilja Tuurmaa
Find the Lion
Viivi-Anni Reinart
Elle Pagil
Maie Saart
Juta Koppel
Väino Aavik
Help Kuldmaa
Hugo Kukk
Valter Mosquito
Maiu Hairk
Milvi Lõun
Hilja Paberits

1954

Heljo Kiho
Aimi Kuusk
Elvi Koppel
Valdur Muruvee
Aarne Tõnn
Peeter Lõuk
Külli-Mai Lõun
Linda Paakspuu
Kaljo Low
Arvo Sild
Eldur Nell
Nurme Kose

1955

Henno Lõun
Kalev Suursaar
Peeter Risik
Eino Opp
Roomet Flight

1956

Milvi Illik
Ivy wahi
Linda Aro
Arvid End
Virve Tõll
August Kiil
Axel Nell
Asta Kuub
Urmas Lõuk
Lea Siim

1957

Maimu Albert
Utah Kose
Sirje Viimsalu
Taivo Tang
Ilme Saar
Vendo Lõun
Rein Naarismaa
Helbe Lõun
Loreida Kõuts
Helmi Laidmaa
Lusti Mägi
Mati Muruvee

1958

Uuno Kremm
Priit Lõuk
Annie Kiirend
Ellen Lilp
Ado Kuusk
Jüri Viiand
Linda Suurhans
Ellen Jürgen
Vaik Paberits
Siiri Beach
Urve Raun
Jaan Koop
Aimi Koppel
Heimar Sepp
Alfred Lätt

1959

Peeter aro
Aime End
Peeter Jalakas
Ellen Kubits
Tõnu Naarismaa
Uno Raudsepp
Valve Paperboard
Aili Saar
Eda Soostemaaker
Your own Tõnn

1960

Jaan Mägi
Heino Sild
Ellen Lätt
Lembit Kahm
Vilja Viiand
Marje Saar
Urve Lilp
Jaan Scall

1961

Endel Kirss
Aksel End
Olav Tabur
Peep Reinart
Vello Muruvee
Maire Aavik
Maia Sage
Eve Veegen
Inge Rüütel
Vegetable Piłczyna
Aala Rotmeister
Maret Risik
Naima Tiits
Aide Sirkel
Irma Viimsalu
Helgi Muruvee

1962
(first 8 class flight)

Aksel End
Olev Tabur
Peep Reinart
Maire Aavik
Maia Sage
Eve Veegen
Vegetable Piłczyna
Maret Risik
Naima Tiits
Inge Rüütel
Aide Sirkel
Irma Viimsalu
Helgi Muruvee

1963

Eini Aavik
Aino Hints
Juvenile Accelerator
Marve Leivat
Harald Lilp
Urve Raamat
Elvi Sepp
Helmut Mosquito
Mai Velvelt
Milvi Aedmaa

1964

Ellen Hairk
Velda Kolk
Liivi Kuusk
Sirje Nelis
Helene Opp
Maie Pihelpuu
Hillar Rand
Anti Sirkel
Tiio Timmermann
Elma Tomson
Sirje Uustulnd
Silvi Viiand
Martin Kaju
Harri Tõnn

1965

Tõnis Muruvee
Uno Väälik
Heiki Raudsepp
Erika Reinart
Enel Sauna
Evi Toompuu
Urmas Toompuu
Mati Viimsalu

1966

Asta Kraaner
Maie Murula
Liivi Muruvee
Taivi Petrov
Elle Lepik
Helje Toompuu
Poetry Kirss

1967

Andres Aru
Arno Lember
Liisi Kiirend
Enno Pihelpuu
Salme Tiits
Hillar Uustulnd
Taivim Viimsalu

1968

Thea Page
Volley Lember
Eimo Väälik
Rein Raudsepp
Vaike Risik
Eha Scall
Alje Tiits
Linda Viiand
Liiv Sepp

1969

Harri Aduson
Väino End
Paavo Kaju
Liia Lepik
Jaan Muruvee
Marje Muruvee
Maret Paakspuu
Silja Parbus
Lea Sepp
Saima Pira

1970

Marge Lepik
Malle Eindof
Tiia Õun
Helgi Reinart
Maaja Pisler
Toivo Sepp
Jaanus Juhanson

Most Famous Alumni

Rudolf Reinaru (1911-1993) - the first student at Vaivere School who completed higher education, graduating from the University of Tartu in 1935 with the Department of theology.
Rudolf Reinaru served as a teacher at the Church of the Holy and Rõuge, left Estonia in 1944 and operated in the US and Canadian congregations until 1987.

Joosep Reinaru (1921) - epidemiologist, doctor of medicine (1970), professor (1981). Joosep Reinaru graduated from Vaivere School in 1936 and Kuressaare Gymnasium in 1941. A few months later, he was mobilized and participated in the Estonian Shooting Corps in World War II. He graduated from the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Tartu in 1952, there was a lecturer for six years, then a doctor in Kuressaare. During 1961-1987, Joosep Reinaru worked at the Institute of Epidemiology, Microbiology and Hygiene in Tallinn, at the beginning as Research Secretary, later as Head of the Epidemiology Laboratory. From 1988-1992 he was a professor at the University of Tartu Hygiene. Since 1993, Professor of Emeritus.

Lucia-Esmene Reinart-Tasa (1932) graduated from Vaivere School in 1947 with honors, Kingisepp's Secondary School Silver Medal and the honors of the Pharmaceutical Department of the Faculty of Medicine of the University of Tartu. Lucia Tasa was a long-time Saaremaa pharmacy no. 49 Head and Kuressaare Pharmacy No. 50 managers In 1976 he was awarded the title of medal welter. Since retirement in 1989.

Taivo Lõuk (1934) graduated from Vaivere School in 1948, at the Kuressaare Secondary School in 1952 and acquired an engineering hydrotechnical profession at the Estonian Academy of Agrarian Sciences. After completing the EPA in 1957, Taivo Lõuk worked as the chief engineer of land improvement in Hiiumaa. From 1964 to 1907, he became chairman of the Saare EPT and Head of the Agriculture Board, and in 1991-1993 became the first Mayor of Kuressaare to regain independence in Estonia. In retirement, he was elected chairman of Kuressaare City Council. Long-term member of city council, as well as chairman of the association of pensioners.

Enn Lõuk (1936) graduated from Vaivere School in 1950, Kuressaare Secondary School in 1954. After graduating from the University of Tartu Faculty of Medicine in 1964, he worked for a shorter time at the Kingissepp Hospital. He later worked as a cardiologist at Pärnu Hospital. Enn Lõuk is a well-known author of beekeeping products as an advocate of natural herbal medicines and related books.

Paavo Lõuk (1939) graduated from Vaivere School in 1951, Kingisepp Secondary School in 1955 and Moscow Lomonosov's name. Honored by the Faculty of Physics at the National University in 1961, she became a researcher in semiconductor field at the Institute of Physics and Astronomy at the Academy of Sciences. Paavo Lõuk is a candidate for science in physics and mathematics, and in 1982 he was awarded a national science award.

Külli-Mai Lõuk-Teesalu graduated from Vaivere School in 1954, Kingissepa High School in 1958, and Faculty of Medicine in Tartu University in 1964. He worked as an internist in medicine at Kuressaare, later in Tartu.

Priit Lõuk (1944) graduated from Vaivere School in 1958, at the Kingissepa Secondary School in 1962. After graduating from high school, he studied at the Faculty of Mathematics and Physics at the University of Tartu, but was taken from the military. After graduating from the Leningrad Air Force School in 1970, he worked as a flight attendant at Tartu Airport. After graduating from the Leningrad Civil Aviation Academy, he was the commander of the Tartu Airborne Division, from 1984 to 1991, the Deputy Director General of the Estonian Civil Aviation Administration, from 1991 to 97, the Director General of Estonian Air, and since 1997, ELK Director General of Airways.

Elvi Koppel-Põder (1940) graduated from Vaivere School in 1954 with honors from Kingissepa High School in 1958, with honors from the University of Tartu in Estonian Philology in 1963 and with the praise of the 1972 Psychology specialty. Elvi Põder worked as a lecturer in psychology at the University of Tartu, since 1987. Psychology of the Institute of Earth Sciences and Joint Research of the Agricultural University.

Helmut Sääsk (1947) graduated from Vaivere School in 1963, at Kingissepp High School in 1966, at the Law School of the High School of Military in the USSR Leningrad Ministry of Internal Affairs in 1977. In 1987, he graduated from the USSR as an associate at the Academy of the Ministry of the Interior. He has been the Chief of the Militia Department, Rakvere's first police prefect, later in the same office in Saaremaa, the Director General and Adviser of the Police Board in Tallinn in 1995-97, and since 1997, the head of the investigation service in Saaremaa. Other alumni are somewhat different, but not everyone can read for a variety of reasons.

Memories of school years

Taivo Lõuk

My school journey began in 1942. I was well prepared for the school, so I thought I was in the second month after class II, where I was the youngest. There was a fairly long, three and a half miles to the schoolhouse at Kastli, and it was a difficult challenge for the little man. At first my father encouraged his hand, and later I visited my neighbor's room with Loi and his brothers. A lot of interesting things happened on the way, especially in the spring during the flood and autumn, when the first ice was formed on the loach. Then it was necessary to try, whether ice is still wearing - often did not wear and had to go home with wet "infantry". (The boots at that time were not included every day, under the guidance of my mother, we sewed a thick "cloth" cloth, whose soles were cut from the car's air). The battleship of Kadarik has been repeatedly crushed by rock or snow so that everyone can go "in the right direction" to everyone.

In the spring, at the Cube Truth, we kept a plan on how to clog the hole with ice-clogs so that the water would run over and we could not go to school. When the water was lower, the children of Papa Kassa dipped over their rubber boots, but with more water they sent home. On the initiative of the big boys, the long icebergs turned upside down in front of the lobster, so that the flow was blocked and eventually got rid of the day off. The fact that here was the hand of their boys in the game, the papa never knew.

Once the big boys made us, "papapoei", a snowman on the nose. We thought we were complaining about the papacy. But we did not get the right. Papa said that how can you get three against three (me, Enno, Paavo). That was what we all said, and we made ourselves conclusion: we are men and nobody came to us again.

Like boys, we also wanted to try our smoke. We got some smells somewhere. But the papa did not smoke and quickly discovered our "man".

He went out of the room and came back soon enough, accompanied the tobacco leaves, and turned to us "plotks" in front. I remember this passing, which followed, to this day.

We had a hard time at home, and father and mother were the teacher. We felt that we had to be at the level, especially with our learning and behavior. During the summer, we had to help parents with hunting, gardening and grazing animals. The proximity of the sea was flattering, but we did not get free time until the homework was done.
The war years were heavy, there was a shortage of food and most of the clothes came from home.

I remember when we got our first bike. We started to go to school. We got to drive half a kilometer, then we exchanged.

In the first post-war years, there was no kerosene. We learned "tattnina" in white. The calyx was cut in half, cut from inside to hollow. It was surrounded by a tree that was wrapped around a watt or a strip of clothing. It became the will. The browning, usually sheep fat, was poured into a scallop and allowed to quench. The light source was ready. We ate it, we learned, and the parents improved the booklets.

We were good children for our parents and we were rewarded for it: one cow was sold out and an accordion was bought for us. We learned to play it and we started to appear on the school board.

Under the leadership of Anton Reinart, we went to the gym after having spent some hours in the forest pine forest. We had our own fitness equipment: a hazelnut, a genuine round stone. When I was already in high school, we put together a team of volleyball with our family and competed there.

I remind my parents of gratitude, who made every effort to have food on the table and clothes on the clothes and home-made home. We got all - four brothers and sisters - higher education. I have not seen myself as a sacrificial woman before or after my mother's birth. Papa was rigorous, but in some cases she was less gentle than mom.

Only decades later, people will understand what they give home, school, childhood. In our time, we also learned to be anxious for parents, and the understanding of the need for learning came later.

Leida Iir (Spirited by Leida)

Albert Lõuk came to Vaivere in 1942 with his son Taivo. Taivo said always when talking to his co-workers: Papa said, Papa did that, and so on. Next year, the son of the school Enn and Papa were even more talked about. In 1945, Albert Lõupid became director, but with each other, we called him papa Lõõu, and the school was named Papa Lõõk school.

He became a real role model for his sons, students and teachers, being demanding and balanced, but friendly and humorous. As a capable manager, he managed to develop the school so that he was among the best in the division. Vaivere's school became his life work.

Every time there are those who do not remember the school with a good word. Such people have often left school and have not understood the need for education. Here are reminders of Endel Reinarat's rumors:

"When I was a child, sometimes it seemed that the teacher simply teased me. Because the right was left over, and the hatred made mistakes in ink."

However, a majority of Vaivere graduates still have the pride of their school and reminds them of their school time with gratitude.

Maim Nell (Muratz Raun)

From the school of Vaivere I became a fan of folk dance. The teacher, Liidia Tamm, also taught folk dancing and role play alongside classes in Estonian. I was dancing with Matise Metaga (Meeta Tamm) at that time. She became a folk dance teacher later.

Just remember one incident with the teacher's Lamp. In school, the brothers of Polish origin Rožinskai, one was in Salumägi, the second in Kandja, the godfather. The lamp got angry at Juhan and scratched the small harmonies of the lanterns with fist and Tahitian Juhani. Juhan did not grow up and cried out: "Take off or hairs with a dome, tomorrow I will not go to school anymore!" And it did not come. President Punab apologized for what happened, but the boy did not raise his foot to school.

Elvi Pajur Murat

Studying at Vaivere School in the 20's. I went to school at age 10. I could read it, but not write it. In the schoolhouse there were 3 rooms with long benches and tables inside. It was cumbersome to go with boys and climb over benches, wearing long skirts!

There were not enough pencils at that time. There was a letterbox with a slash stylus. The teacher kept hold of him and so I write about learning. There was a separate notebook for tension. We used a board and a dash for practice. The board had a small gray plate inside the drill. We wore a slab and a dash all the time. Mom sewed a thick bag for school bags. There was a separate difference for the sandwich.

School accident happened at once. On the street Ella, one boy took a shotgun with a gun. The joy was great, the doctor was called to school and Ella got help. What a boyfriend punished, no longer remembered. After World War I there was a lot of dangerous munitions and so many times it got into the hands of children.

Endel Reinart (Graduate, Teacher, 1946)

All your work and effort is zero

Jüri speaks from the twilight.
Others went home
but on her home
says: go home. "

Teacher prepared a plan,
thinking: wait for a boyfriend
I'll teach you clear
give you the word "home".

After a lesson a little man
words in line will be pushed.
The correct language in the sign -
"home, home ... prints.

Teacher forgot
But boy.
The class just came out
in a few hours.

Watched - on the desk full of notebook
words of a whole lot,
but over the cover goes:
"I went home!"

Former students of the Vaivere School, who have fallen and unknown in World War II

When the boy was rushing to war
There was no trace of him, difficulty in front of him.
War is a war, do not ask for it
Are you the only one in your family or you are already a father.
Only fortune and happiness gave you mercy,
To keep your life down the dust with a ball.
Fathers and mothers had to raise their sons
violence, power, evil,
violent war, death.

Needy to put pressure on their dust
whose groundbreaking hell was born.
A painful fire injury is a loss
human beings
who gave their lives for our good luck.

It made sense to move
and collect names.
Do not make a difference -
who, where or for what.
It is important to keep a memory
people who have lost their lives violently.

L.Iir

In the days of World War II, they perished or remained unknown

Box from the village Artur Jõevere (Laudalt), Artur Koopuu (Maanult), Aleksander Rahnel (Lilbilt);
Juri Kurikjan (Annilt), Paul and Aksel Noogen (on the scale), Oskar Aavik (Tirissult), in the village of Kärdu, murdered in Kuressaare Castle courtyard in 1941;
Murat's village Aleksander Aavik (Nurgalt), August Arula (Nukilt), Eduard and Voldemar Jakson (Freestyle), Richard Jürgens (Arult), Ilmar Kalm (from field), Rudolf Lember (Liigud), Johannes Lõuk (Lõõult), Voldemar Ots (Timur) ), Aksel Reinart Main), Alfred and Leopold Tiivits (Kandjalt), Friedrich and Voldemar Õun (Rannalt);
Desperate Eduard Allik (Endrekult), Paul Risik (Lallelt), August Risik (Field), Kirill Lepik (Tõll) - assassinated in the courtyard of the castle in 1941, Aleksander Sirkel (Aavik), Mihkel Punab (Punabe-saun), Eduard Tõll (Nukilt);
Vaiverest August Alder (Ollist), Bernhard End (Soeralt), Alexander and Robert Kiider (from Riids), Juhan Kiider (Marguselt), Voldemar Lember (Salumäelt), August Loiken (Viiumaa), Johannes Reinaru (Uustlult), Rein Ro˛inski (Salumäelt) , Eduard Saar (from the sauna), Boris Street (Mulgult), Johannes Tomson (Street);
Vatskylast Ismail Kaljulaid (Kaljulaid), Rudolf Maripuu (Uustlult), Arnold and Bernhard Saart (Peter), Herbert Sild (Allikalt), Mihkel Vattel (Lehtmetsalt);
Praak Konstantin and Manivald Lepik (Lepikult), Gustav Lõun (from Venel).

Vaivere School in 1991-2001

There was a year in the year 1990. There was a growing debate about the necessity of re-opening the school. The government supported the restoration of former low-school schools, the rural municipality government was re-opening the school, the buildings were preserved - in such a situation, the Vaivere school's rebirth was possible.

On September 1, 1991, after a break of 10 years, the school again opened its doors, this time as a four-level elementary school, and 10 pupils began schooling. Inga Küüt graduated from the Tartu Teachers' Seminary in the spring, as the teacher of the school. Ene Grass, music teacher. This day was a long-awaited major event for the entire community.

On this occasion, the school's alumni Leida Iir have devoted the following lines:

Today we have reason to come together again,
Joy can be felt again at the schoolhouse again.
Finished house of silence and agony -
Children can be seen here.

A lot of work has been done here, hands
you see with your own eyes.
Repeat is made of classes and kemps,
go transported by the cliff and junk.

The house shines in the new sixth
The children of Oot are happy in great numbers.
Beginning is hard, money is scarce
must remain in labor and will.

Good luck with you, schoolgirl
every morning says hello
lively, happy
be it a schoolchild.

The next year, the 5th grade was added and already 27 students were enrolled in the list of students. There came a teacher Inge Arnold. A little hard-hitting school girlfriend learned about the funny rules that everyone could get involved with.

In 1993, students were 35 and added to the 6th grade. Students also came from the surrounding villages. Kairi Virveste and Mai Lember, who previously worked at Vaivere School, started their work. Former teachers remained on childhood leave. The KEK Island also provided the school with a part of the canteen and hall where extensive repairs were made. Her father, Heli Jõveveer, made a large wall painting that attracts every entrant.

In the spring of 1994, the first graduation certificates were issued to graduates of the 6th form. During the summer, alumni gatherings were held and a memorial plaque was opened to former long-time school leaders. In the autumn, 34 pupils came to school.

A year later, 24 students attended the school, Inga Küüts and Mai Lember continued their teaching, with Daili Tuuling and Krista Kuusk.

On September 27, 1996, the 5th anniversary of the reopened school was celebrated. The former teachers, students and guests were invited. The pupils performed with a nice curtain in which all the pupils-teachers taught.

In the case of the anniversary, Leida Iir wrote the following poems:

Hello again, Vaivere school!
Today you are welcome old and young.
We are all your former children,
Through the centuries of wisdom that was shared here, you learned.

Something big and sweet we left you breath
when we were your little schoolchildren.
Then your house and the garden seemed big
even higher classes appeared on the ceilings.

The small ones were then and so hilarious
Teachers are important and wise.
So kind of a homey feeling for a small school
encouraged us to find joy and happiness.

So it lasted from generation to generation,
you have more than one hundred and twenty years of age.
Better - the worst days you've seen,
the winds of time have passed since.

Today reminiscent of joys, worries and scratches,
which for years we have joined together.
Joy in the heart, songs in the mouth,
welcomes all new generations!

In the fall of 1997, there were 32 students at school and the first time a group of pre-schoolers was opened: 10 puppys - a girl started her school education under the tutelage teacher Mai Lember.

In the next school year, 31 students attended school, plus 6 pre-school students.

The strength of Vaivere's school has always been an act of self-defense, also in the late 19th century. Ene Grass was able to sing and dance for every child. Under her guidance, a play "12 months" was performed, which was performed in other schools and kindergartens.

During the Christmas season 1998, Krista Kuusk performed the play "Chickens" in Kuressaare Castle. The biggest achievement was the third place in April 1997 in Saaremaa Schoolchildren's Culture Days for the play "Black and White Karoline". Part is taken from many art and craft exhibitions.

The school has its own traditional events: Autumn Dance, Sports Days, Christmas Eve, Christmas Party, Midsummer Day, Mother's Day, and Cultural Week, during which summaries of learned plays, poems, and songs are made. An excursion to the mainland or some small island is organized each year.

On 1 September 1999, Vaivere School ceased to act as an independent legal entity and was subordinated to the Kaarma Basic School. The current head teacher, Inga Küüts, started work in Kuressaare and Vaivere, as teachers, Krista Kütt, Daily Tuuling and Mai Lember continued their work with 24 students.
The following year, another 16 students attended school, Mai Lember was a replacement teacher.

In 2001, it was clear that the fate of the school was decided: there were so few students that the school overkill had made it pointless. In May, the final closing ceremony took place in the school building. "Our Earth" writes in its 7th of June issue:
"At the end of the year, the six graduates of the 4th grade of the last graduation certificate at the Vaivere School received a total of 17 children, while 17 students at the Kaarma School, Vaivere Branch, studied at Kaarma School. Aime Pihel, Vaivere School Teacher Krista Kütt and youth worker Inga Teär spoke about Vaivere School 10 years ago. According to Social Worker Liida Kaare, the Vaivere School, where a friendly and informal schoolhouse was operating, is always good to come. Ülo Vevers, the rural municipality governor, had to confirm that the number of children in the surrounding villages is decreasing, and therefore the closure of the school is inevitable.
Recently, the Vaivere School has been operating over a ten-year cycle, and optimists expect the Vaivere School to re-enter life for at least ten years. "

Students' books of the Reverberate School of Vaivere have enrolled 84 students from 1991 to 2001. Of these, Vaiveres has only been educated for 6 years, many have started their school elsewhere or have gone to other schools for various reasons.

All six years studied Inge Grass, Annika Jõveveer, Madis Hiiet, Romet Vasemägi, Tõnis Tuulik. Vaivere Annika Müür studied for the first five years, who graduated from all grades with praise and continued to live in Kuressaare as a result of his residence.

Vaivere School's Last Student List 2000/2001

Class I
Jürgen Kivi
Maanus Koppel

Class II
Annie Mikko
Sirly Kallas
Alex Kallas
Janar Johanson

Class III
Mare Kiider
Marie Jõveveer
Tiina Tuulik
Maero Pruul

Class IV
Alice Kallas
The wind was blowing
Kristjan Pilv
Kadi Pors
Triin Pors
Anita Hansen

Student Looks

The coming of the spring

Sunrise on the heavens -
large and light yellow.
Beloved sun, okay
warm your head.

Spring, let's go to the yard
blooming beautiful flowers.
The sky is blue and delicate
I hear the throat.

Blue-collar and cuff aid
the ditch on the edge of the bloom.
They are happy because the winter is over;
warm without enjoying.

Madis Hiet, Grade 6


Spring

In April, the waters are flowing,
Sacrifice buds are coming out.
Birds are busy
there is a beautiful spring month.
Tõnis Tuulik, class 6


We are waiting for you, spring!

March is the spring months
snowflakes in the blossom,
hide under the blossom of snow

Melt snow, scrub water.
I swallowed my feet in the ditch.
Wild animal and bird:
"We are waiting for spring, SIND!"
Raivo Pilv, Class 6


Life is a precious asset

Life is a precious asset,
which can never be bought.
If you've lost your life,
then it will not be back.

Life is a precious asset,
which must be kept carefully.
If you have lost your mindset,
then search and start again.

Life is the most expensive treasure
under the sun
life is dear to everyone
breathing deeply.
Maido Hiet 6th Class


What do I have to do with life?

There are many important things in life: life, family, work, money and love.
Life must be maintained, there is only one person in it. Life must be fun and you also need to fill up. For some people, only money is important, but a lot of money makes people crazy. People must keep one, help others, protect and love. I think all people should be equal.
Raivo Pilv, 5th grade


My school

I came to this school in 1997. I first visited the city school, it was hard for me. There are good teachers here and I'm doing better. The school has the same number of students as a high school in one class. I have a lot of friends and no one feels better than the others. The only bad thing is that there are compound classes here. But it teaches to work independently.
Our school is located on a beautiful place. There are not many cars here. We have made many performances. We went to the castle with one. On Mothers' Day, we played the "Vanapagana" show, which everyone liked very much. Teacher Krista is the best teacher of this school because she has organized all these events and performances. He teaches well.
We also go to school for excursions. In the summer we went to Viljandi. It liked me very much.
Vaivere's school is the best school I've been to, and I want the new school to go from Vaiver to the same.
Tanel Perens, Class 6


Home and homelessness

I think that home is a safe place, a place where every child is protected from the worries of the world. There are a lot of children who do not have a home. There are several reasons. One of the reasons is that the parents of the child drink and beat children. This is the reason why children leave their homes and live on the street. Street bombers are stealing to stay alive, get into the camps. There they learn to drink, smoke and use drugs. Such rooms are dangerous to society.
And still I think - all problems come from home, from parents. Every child should have a home and loved parents. Particularly, I have a story about the parents who have taken care of their childcare and care for their children.
Romet Vasemägi, Class 6


Winter spells

Again, there is a winter month,
bushy shrubs, white trees.
Being out there is so good
flutter against head.

There are many children on the hornock
they are getting loud there.
They're good to be there
proud on a high hill.
Annika Müür


Hour in the zoo

There was a beautiful and sunny day. We went to the zoo with our mother. We reached the lion's cage and I asked, "Why is the lion so sad?" Mom answered: "The lion is longing for his former life, in which he had freedom and plenty of space." I asked again: "Why did he come to live here?" My mother said, "She came here herself; she was brought to power from her friends and her parents."
I got sad. Think for yourself if you should be in a healthy life in a cage prison. It was hard for me to think about it and it made a pain in my heart. I started losing the lion, but what can a child do for the lion. The lion looked at me with his eyes and looked as if he were crying and asking for his former life.
We were only an hour in the zoo, but I learned a lot about animals. In particular, it became clear about freedom.
Maido Hiet, Grade 5


My dad

My dad is cute, smart and decent. Her hair is brown and her eyes are also brown. My dad is 1.87 m long. She is skinny in her building. She is 35 years old. He likes to play computer games and read books. He is polite and intelligent.
My father's daily work is to receive furniture and deal with invoices. My dad does not have a lot of friends. He likes cabbage soup and apple jam. My dad is best able to draw a cat and all kinds of other animals. I value my father's most love for me and other family members.
Triin Pors, Grade 4


Food meeting

Once the food started to be consulted. It happened before lunch when the children were still at school and the parents were at work. The kitchen had a large round table and set all the food on the table. Incidentally, somebody's birthday was in the family and therefore the potato pancake and cream cream came out of the refrigerator. Creamy Tortoise was, as always, the most beautiful and praised for its beauty and taste. Potato salad, however, thought that without it, no belly would be full. The fatty meatballs also wanted to sip something, jumped over the white dish on the daisies and whined: "We make everything thin and thick and we have the most calories."
"I'm the best in terms of calories," Halvaa said. All bunches: Herring, Meatballs, Compotes and Dessert Dish. Everyone wanted to be the best.

Suddenly an old gray cat came from the second room. Jump on the table, took some pieces of meat and jumped back to the floor. All the foods were silent now. No one knew who was next - did the cat get stomach full? Madam Puder interrupted the silence: "So my darling, you know that healthy eating is very important. I'm good - the children growing up with mess would be beautiful and strong. Some food whispered, some began to get bogged down, and Miss Milk kept herself in Powder because she thought she had one essential and healthy drink.

Then the door opened, and Mare and Riho stepped into the kitchen. The kids sniffed one and the other food, Mare Riho called: "There is nothing naughty here, I'm going to buy potatoes and pepsi!" Mare did not get to talk about it when Riho said: "Wait, I'll come!"
Foods that were too praised for themselves were silent about why children did not want to.
Kaspar Jõeveer, Class 4


Karate Spring

Take it from the other side
your cock is twisted.
But now, when the snow melts,
ui is going to be out soon.
Drop him on his head
scrape a cave out of it.
"Hello, the sun, hello, spring!"
he cries for joy.
Romet Vasemägi Class 6


Spring

Spring came now
the water started to get wet, the creepy.
The sun began to peek
to climb higher.
Alari Loik, 4th grade


Homeland

Home cute me
cute to all.
Go home
go home!
I'll tell everyone.
Geil Tuuling, 3rd class


By the creator

I was born on October 30, 1934, in the Vaivere farmer's family as the youngest child. In the fall of 1942, I became a student at Vaivere's 6th grade school. After graduating from the 7th grade of the school in 1949, I worked as a salesperson in Kuressaare for a few years and I began to study at the Olustvere Agricultural School, which I graduated with honors in 1958. I worked in Olustveres as an agronomist. later as a technician teacher until 1980. In 1972, I graduated from EPA Faculty of Agronomy with distance learning.

I resumed living in Saaremaa. In 1984-1991 I worked at Kuressaare Vocational Secondary School No. 26 as a teacher of agricultural subjects until retirement.

I have a soul of nature, and therefore I chose the agronomist's invitation. From nature I have received vitality and peace of mind throughout my life.

Wild forests, fields,
Quiet sea coast -
they've been in my life
power, talent sources.

I have devoted part of my retirement years to the study and writing of the history of the home town, which resulted in the 1999 "Vaivere village story" for the first mention of the Vaivere village, and the cover of the 185th anniversary of the first mention of the school, Vaivere Culture Story, was also covered.

To finish

The Vaivere school and cultural background reflects the life of the inhabitants of the Vaivere region for centuries. Significantly influenced by the success of the people of these places, Vaivere's location and frequently changed state regime - at first Danish and Swedish times, the Russian tsar's time, the period of independence, Soviet rule and re-independence.

I'm sorry to read the reader that more is named Vaivere's name. I am thinking, in particular, of the villages in the Vaivere school district; In school, the children also visited the villages of Murats, Praakli, Kärduküla, Tahula, Kasti, Vatsküla and Lilbi. The inhabitants of the same villages were also active social life promoters.

The deep worship and thanks to Vaivere's school and cultural life designers and leaders, school teachers and our ancestors over the centuries, today Vauer has something to remember, recall and write.

with respect

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